JOAQUIN
TRUJILLO


— OjO

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Mal de Ojo, or the “evil eye,” is a superstition deeply rooted in Latin American popular culture. As a child in rural Mexico, Joaquin Trujillo was believed to be the victim of this spiritual affliction when he contracted scarlet fever and nearly died, suffering permanent eye damage for which he has had repeated corrective surgeries throughout his life. The images from Mal de Ojo revolve around Trujillo’s experience and are in two parts: fetishistic portrayals of the artist’s own physical and psychological trauma and tabletop arrangements of Mexican folk remedies and collections of personal amulets and totems. Often presented as diptychs or triptychs, usually portraits juxtaposed with still lifes in the form of prints or videos, the scenes deal with the psychosocial aspects of isolation and the inherent need for protection and self-preservation.